Spring 2023 COURSES

 

Listed below are all the undergraduate and graduate courses the department is offering in Spring 2023. Courses in all three disciplines offered on the Camden campus are listed first, followed by online courses, courses offered at our off-campus locations, and our graduate program on campus. Courses that satisfy a new general education requirement are denoted by an asterisk.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:070:101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world. Cynthia Saltzman

 

50:070:345 Immigration and Families (3) Examines how migration affects families and family life, for both those who migrate and those who do not, with particular focus on new forms of immigration to the United States since 1965. Topics include political, economic, and social forces that motivate migration; impact of U.S. culture, law, and policy on immigrants’ traditions; assimilation and family life; and issues related to maintaining family structure and ties transnationally. Cristina Escobar

 

50:070:356 People and Cultures of Africa (3) Examines the processes of continuity and change in Africa today and Africa’s relationship to globalization through the Atlantic slave trade, European colonization, the drilling and production of materials like oil and coffee, and international migration. Focuses on the major institutions of kinship and family, economics, politics, and religion, and on contemporary issues such as socioeconomic development, urbanization, gender, and youth. Augustine Isamah

 

50:070:385:90 Special Topics in Anthropology: Anthropological Theory (3) This course will cover the major theories in anthropology, starting with the development and rise of anthropological theory in the late 19th century (e.g. Evolutionism) and continuing with contemporary developments in theory (e.g. Poststructuralism and Postmodernism). It will include theories by leading anthropologists such as Boas, Malinowski, Mead, Levi Strauss, Geertz and Bourdieu. Patrick McCarty (online only)

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:202:101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (R) (3) American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to post conviction and release. Harry Rhea

 

50:202:202 Police and Policing (3) Explores the role of the police officer in the criminal justice system as well as the function of law enforcement in the United States. Includes historical foundations, trends, organizational structures, strategies, and issues concerning American police and policing. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Daniel Howard

 

50:202:305 Critical Issues in CJ (3) This course will focus on the relationships that exist between ethics and justice as it is manifested in the contemporary criminal justice system. The topics to be discussed include punishment and sentencing, rights of those who are traditionally oppressed, the so-called “blue wall of silence” among police, privatization of criminal justice components, and the death penalty. Additionally, students will be expected to critically think about ethical reasoning as it pertains to justice and injustice and what shapes their viewpoints in this area. Ross Allen

 

50:202:306 Urban Gun Violence (3) Examines the reality of gun violence in urban communities of color from both social science and public health perspectives. Broadly speaking, this course examines: (1) the social, political, and economic forces behind the rates of violence in poor communities of color in the United States, (2) the role of guns and gun markets in the spread of violence in these communities, (3) criminal justice approaches to gun violence intervention, and (4) public health approaches to violence prevention. Students will be working alongside a community-based violence intervention program in Camden focused on stopping the spread of violence in the city. Daniel Semenza

 

50:202:322 Juvenile Justice Juvenile offenders and the changing perception of juvenile crime; the legal status of juvenile offenders and the role of the family court in preventing delinquency. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 James Williams

 

50:202:328 Forensics: Methods and Techniques (3) Forensic Science Methods & Techniques is designed to introduce students to a range of forensic techniques that cut across all the life and physical sciences.  Each session will cover the basic science underlying each technique as well as its practical application during a criminal investigation.  A lab module accompanies this course to provide an opportunity for hands-on work.  Kimberlee Moran

 

50:202:329 Forensics: Lab (1) This lab is designed to provide students with hands-on experience performing a range of forensic examinations and analyses in a laboratory setting. Methods are derived from the chemical and biological sciences.  Students enrolled in this course must also be enrolled in or have taken 202 / 120 / 160:328.Kimberlee Moran

 

50:202:337 Inequality in Criminal Justice (3) Examines the disproportionate representation of poor and racial minorities in the United States criminal justice system. Includes trends, policies, and issues concerning the effects of class and race on justice outcomes. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Sarah Tosh

 

50:202:348 Practicum: National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated (3) Provides students with an opportunity to be part of a program that spans three decades in providing resources on children and families of the incarcerated. Opportunities for students include gathering and disseminating current research and resources, identifying policy and practice initiatives across the country, tracking the needs of programs and systems, requesting information, participating in public awareness campaigns, and collaboration in planning for NRCCFI events and activities. Ann Adalist-Estrin

 

50:202:354:40 ST in Criminal Justice: Counterterrorism Strategies How do we protect ourselves from terrorism? Understanding terrorism is paramount to developing counter-

terrorism strategies, techniques, and operations. Counterterrorism is defined by the nature and typology of the terrorist acts themselves. Like many other counter measures, it is fluid and often unpredictable. Therefore, we must be smart and progressive in planning for, detecting and mitigating potential terrorist attacks. In doing so we are further obligated to be ever mindful of human rights and protected freedoms. Francis McGovern

 

50:202:361 Criminal Law (3) Perspectives of leading attorneys or judges on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on criminal law as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 Harry Rhea

 

50:202:362 Special Topics in CJ: Careers in Sociology and Criminal Justice This course will expose students to the variety of careers available to students with a Sociology and/or Criminal Justice major. Through hands on activities, class discussion and guest speakers, students will develop tools to effectively communicate their expertise and relevant experiences to prospective employers. Laura Napolitano

 

50:202:375 Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: Comparative Criminal Justice in U.K. (G) (3) A course focusing on crime and justice of a foreign country. Includes regular class meetings, required readings, and written assignments, as well as a short-term learning/service experience in a foreign country. Ross Allen

 

50:202:404 Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and instructor permission. Cheryl Hallman

 

50:202:405 Criminal Investigation Practicum (3) Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Course may be repeated for 6 credits (only 3 credits can be counted toward electives for criminal justice majors). Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: 50:202:201 or 50:202:201 and instructor permission. Kevin Murphy

 

50:202:420 International Criminal Law and Justice (3) Examines subject of international criminal justice, which includes the prosecution and punishment of crimes that shock the conscience of the international community, namely genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. History and development of international criminal justice, crimes established under international law, mechanisms of prosecuting perpetrators of international crimes, and general principles of international criminal law. Harry Rhea

 

50:202:449 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Nathan Link

 

 

  

SOCIOLOGY (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:920:101 Introduction to Sociology (3) Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology. Joanna Cohen Kallan

 

50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Kayla Preito-Hodge

 

50:920:306 Sociology of the Family (3) Examines family life in the United States through a sociological lens. Covers historic and current trends in American family life and provides an examination of how social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the family. Augustine Isamah

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207 or 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Richard Stansfield

 

50:920:332 Inequality in the United States (3) Analyzes class inequality and the class structure in U.S. society, with particular attention to the processes which generate, reproduce, and change social and economic inequalities, as well as the consequences of inequality. When offered with a lab, this course has a mandatory engaged civic learning component (ECL), included in a 1-credit lab section, making the course worth a total of 4 credits rather than 3. In those circumstances, all students must register for the course and one lab section, and the 1-credit lab section is a corequisite. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207. Joan Mazelis

 

50:202:346 Special Topics in Sociology: Careers in Sociology and Criminal Justice This course will expose students to the variety of careers available to students with a Sociology and/or Criminal Justice major. Through hands on activities, class discussion and guest speakers, students will develop tools to effectively communicate their expertise and relevant experiences to prospective employers. Laura Napolitano

 

50:920:445 ST in Sociology: Human Sexuality (3) Sexuality is an important domain of human life. It encapsulates some of our greatest pleasures and is part of good health. At the same time, sexuality can involve tremendous risk and personal tragedy. Although sexuality is thought to be something that is just “natural” and private, sexualities are deeply social. Sexualities are causes for political mobilization. They are produced in concert with numerous other social institutions. The sociological study of sexualities can be a window into understanding larger societies. In this course we will explore relationships between individuals and sexual communities by using sociological theories and concepts. Gorken Dagdelen

 

CAMDEN COUNTY COLLEGE – BLACKWOOD CAMPUS

50:202:304:90 Death Penalty (3) History of capital punishment and contemporary use of the death penalty, including trends and statistics. Problems and issues pertaining to capital punishment, constitutional challenges to the death penalty, and the current state of capital jurisprudence. Prerequisites:50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Brenna Stone (online only)

 

50:202:350:C1 Punishment and Sentencing (3) Comprehensive overview of all forms of domestic violence and some of the variables such as race, gender, class, and sexual orientation that impact the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes. Specific topics may include intimate partner violence, elder abuse, sexual victimization, and battering. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status, or permission of instructor. Joseph Dagrossa

 

50:920:301:C1 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Joseph DaGrossa

 

50:202:449:C1 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Ross Allen

 

 

ATLANTIC CAPE COMMUNITY COLLEGE – MAYS LANDING CAMPUS

 

50:202:304:90 Death Penalty (3) History of capital punishment and contemporary use of the death penalty, including trends and statistics. Problems and issues pertaining to capital punishment, constitutional challenges to the death penalty, and the current state of capital jurisprudence. Prerequisites:50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Brenna Stone (online only)

 

50:202:326:A1 White Collar Crime (3) (3) History and development of corporate crime, white-collar crime, political corruption, and other “upper-world” crimes. Emphasis on effective strategies for combating this phenomenon. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Dean Wyks

 

50:202:327:A1 Forensic Theory and Policy Heather Garoh

 

50:202:354:90 From Incarceration to Decarceration Walter Campbell (online only)

 

50:202:449:A1 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Tracy Swan

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE GRADUATE PROGRAM

 

56:202:500 Policy Analysis in Criminal Justice (3) A research- and writing-oriented seminar that will prepare students for conducting criminal justice policy analysis. Topics include the role of interest groups and organizational participants in the policy process, types of policies, and models of policy research. Examined are current criminal justice policies using analysis that considers the development, implementation, and evaluation of policy (i.e., what has occurred in policy, why, and at what benefits or costs). Also covered is policy formulation, which involves the development of new policy options to remedy public problems. Gail Caputo

 

56:202:601 Data Analysis in Criminal Justice (3) This course provides students with a grounding in the basic tools used in quantitative analysis in the field of criminal justice along with an introduction to the statistical issues involved in the design and logic of research. Students learn to use various nonparametric measures of association as well as parametric tests of significance and are introduced to the fundamentals of correlation, regression, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistics. Richard Stansfield

 

56:202:673:01 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Investigation Practicum (3) Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Kevin Murphy

 

56:202:674:40 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Practicum: National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated (3) Provides students with an opportunity to be part of a program that spans three decades in providing resources on children and families of the incarcerated. Opportunities for students include gathering and disseminating current research and resources, identifying policy and practice initiatives across the country, tracking the needs of programs and systems, requesting information, participating in public awareness campaigns, and collaboration in planning for NRCCFI events and activities. Ann Adalist-Estrin

 

56:202:675 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: Comparative Criminal Justice in U.K. (3) A course focusing on crime and justice of a foreign country. Includes regular class meetings, required readings, and written assignments, as well as a short-term learning/service experience in a foreign country. Ross Allen

 

56:202:673 Urban Gun Violence (3) Examines the reality of gun violence in urban communities of color from both social science and public health perspectives. Broadly speaking, this course examines: (1) the social, political, and economic forces behind the rates of violence in poor communities of color in the United States, (2) the role of guns and gun markets in the spread of violence in these communities, (3) criminal justice approaches to gun violence intervention, and (4) public health approaches to violence prevention. Students will be working alongside a community-based violence intervention program in Camden focused on stopping the spread of violence in the city. Daniel Semenza