Fall 2021 Courses

 

Listed below are all the undergraduate and graduate courses the department is offering in Fall 2021. Courses in all three disciplines offered on the Camden campus are listed first, followed by online courses, courses offered at our off-campus locations, and our graduate program on campus. Courses that satisfy a new general education requirement are denoted by an asterisk.

 

Anthropology (Camden campus)

 

*50:070:101  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (G) (R) (3) Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world.  Cati Coe

 

50:070:313  Childhood, Health and Illness (3) Introduces issues and trends facing health care professionals, policymakers, and researchers involved in the health, medical care, and treatment of persons under 18 years. Addresses major health problems faced by children; how illness relates to a child’s developing selfhood; children’s knowledge about such issues as health, illness, death, and bodily functions; how care should be given to best serve children’s physical, emotional, and cognitive needs; and health policy related to children’s well-being.  Cynthia Clark

 

50:070:323  Anthropology of American Culture (3) Examines unity and diversity of American culture; methods of study; class, race, and ethnicity; marginal and central groups; and community studies and ethnography.  Cynthia Saltzman

 

50:070:385  Special Topics in Anthropology: Global Health (3) The course will examine issues in global health, focusing on Latin America and Africa, from health infrastructure, to the management of epidemics and competing and alternative perspectives of health and healing. As an anthropology course, the focus will be on health and healing as the product of social relations and everyday

 

 

Criminal Justice (Camden campus)

 

50:202:101  Introduction to Criminal Justice (R) (3) American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to post conviction and release.  Ross Allen, Harry Rhea

 

50:202:202  Police and Policing (3) Explores the role of the police officer in the criminal justice system as well as the function of law enforcement in the United States. Includes historical foundations, trends, organizational structures, strategies, and issues concerning American police and policing. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Kayla Preito-Hodge

 

50:202:203  Confinement and Corrections (3) History and organization of American corrections. Emphasis on sentencing, custodial institutions, intermediate sanctions, community corrections, and mechanisms for release. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Ross Allen

 

50:202:204  Criminal Courts (3) Structures and functions of American courts and law. Courtroom work group; roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel; trial, trial outcomes, and appellate courts. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Harry Rhea

 

50:202:310  Juvenile Delinquency (3) Examines the nature, extent, causes and correlates of youth crime. Topics include the legal status of youth; the measurement of delinquency; the types of offenses youth commonly commit; gender and delinquency; and the role of education, families, peers, and gangs in delinquency.  The course will also examine the philosophy and development of preventive and rehabilitative programs.  Daniel Semenza

 

50:202:320  National Security Risk Assessment and Analysis (3) Explores the various risks posed by threats to national and global security, including threats from terrorist organizations, and what plans and strategies have been put in place to mitigate these risks and protect various infrastructures, such as transportation, energy, nuclear facilities, and information systems. The course will also examine risk assessment methodology and its application to national security policy.  Daniel Howard

 

*50:202:325  Violent Crime (W) (3) Discussion of gangs, homicide, serial crimes of violence, interpersonal violence, and rape. Emphasis on crimes involving weapon use. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Daniel Semenza

 

50:202:346  Children and Families of the Incarcerated (3) Connects research on the impact of parental incarceration, brain development, trauma, toxic stress, attachment, and resilience theories to the experiences of children of incarcerated parents and their families. Examines emerging best practices in serving children with incarcerated parents in education, health/mental health, child welfare, and corrections.  Ann Adalist-Estrin

 

50:202:352  Community Corrections (3) Historical and philosophical overview of the theories behind alternatives to incarceration and their implementation in corrections. Emphasis on their impact and future. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Bryn Herrschaft

 

50:202:354  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Terrorism (3) This course provides a theoretical understanding of terrorism, including the criminological theories of why people become terrorists.  Students are also provided with an overview of the nature, scope, and severity of terrorist tactics, as well as national and international responses to bring terrorists to justice within the framework of international and domestic legal regimes.  Harry Rhea

 

50:202:355  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Forensic Interviewing (3) This three-credit course offers the undergraduate student understanding into the skills and knowledge needed to interview and assess suspects, witnesses and victims.  As a result of taking the course, students may expect to:  gain an understanding of interviewing techniques; identify their own blind spots and cultural biases; learn the basics of listening and responding through role play and demonstration of techniques; understand how to develop an assessment strategy; learn how to write a neutral, objective report.  Dian Williams

 

50:202:404  Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Cheryl Hallman

 

50:202:420  International Criminal Law and Justice (3) Examines subject of international criminal justice, which includes the prosecution and punishment of crimes that shock the conscience of the international community, namely genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. History and development of international criminal justice, crimes established under international law, mechanisms of prosecuting perpetrators of international crimes, and general principles of international criminal law.  Harry Rhea

 

50:202:449  Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; and drug policy. Prerequisites: Senior status.

50:202:101 and 50:920:301.  Nathan Link

 

 

Sociology (Camden campus)

 

50:920:101  Introduction to Sociology (R) (3) Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology.  Joanna Cohen-Kallan, Chinyere Osuji

 

50:920:208  Contemporary Social Problems (R) (3) Survey of contemporary social problems with particular attention to how social issues become defined as “problems” and to how sociological knowledge can inform social policy choices. Topics include poverty, discrimination, family breakup, crime, mental illness, alcoholism, and others. Nonmajors may choose to take this course as a beginning course in sociology.  Katrina Hazzard-Donald

 

50:920:217  Drugs and Society (3) Use and abuse of controlled substances in American society; public health and medical considerations; addiction and treatment; illegal markets; and drug control policy.  Sarah Tosh

 

50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques.  Joanna Cohen-Kallan, Kayla Preito-Hodge

50:920:306  Sociology of the Family (3) Examines family life in the United States through a sociological lens. Covers historic and current trends in American family life and provides an examination of how social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the family.  Augustine Isamah

 

50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:202:101.  Richard Stansfield, Ross Allen

 

*50:920:316  Race and Ethnicity (D) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.  Katrina Hazzard-Donald

 

*50:920:317  Race in Latin America (GCM) (3) Overview of race and race-mixing in Brazil and across the Americas. Interdisciplinary examination of forms of racial categorization, discrimination, and ideologies, whether in the form of nation-building projects, addressing racial inequality, or sexuality and family formation.  Chinyere Osuji

 

50:920:325  Sociological Theory (3) An intensive study of the classical sociological thinkers–Marx, Durkheim, Weber–and a survey of contemporary theoretical traditions in the field. Prerequisite: 50:920:101.  Joan Mazelis

 

50:920:348  Special Topics in Sociology: Masculinities (3) This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of masculinities. Moving past the conception of gender as a fixed biological category, the course addresses the emergence and representations of multiple masculinities in American culture along intersections with race, class, sexuality, and other areas of difference. It examines the ways diverse formations of masculinities function at the individual and collective level in various domains, such as in sports, family, relationships, subcultures, work and other social and physical sites. It addresses issues including the body, female and queer masculinities, maleness, boyhood, and violence. The course is interdisciplinary and will offer various contexts for exploring masculinities, such as academic and popular literature, film, and music.  Gail Caputo

 

50:920:350  Homelessness and Deep Poverty in the U.S. (3) Shelter is one of the most fundamental human needs, but for those who confront severe economic deprivation in the United States, housing is often unaffordable, leaving many without predictable, consistent, and safe places to live. In this course we will use a sociological perspective to learn about poverty in the United States, particularly about the lives of people experiencing homelessness and of those living in deep poverty—defined as below half the official poverty line.  Joan Mazelis

 

 

Online Courses

 

50:070:307  Psychological Anthropology (3) Relation between sociocultural factors and psychological processes among members of different groups: socialization of the individual, culturally determined variations in personality structure, evaluation of theories of personality in light of cross-cultural evidence, and psychological factors in sociocultural change. Prerequisite: 50:070:101.  Cynthia Clark

 

*50:070:338  North American Indians (D) (3) History, cultural background, and contemporary situation of major North American Indian groups. Special attention to social relations, political and religious movements, and cultural change.  Patrick McCarty

 

50:202:304  Death Penalty (3) History of capital punishment and contemporary use of the death penalty, including trends and statistics. Problems and issues pertaining to capital punishment, constitutional challenges to the death penalty, and the current state of capital jurisprudence. Prerequisite: 50:202:201.  Brenna Stone

50:202:355  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Healthcare Policy and Practice in Corrections (3) The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the inadequacies and inequities in the correctional healthcare system, but the problems with healthcare for individuals housed in prisons and jails have a long history within the United States. In this class, we will explore that history, learning about major physical and mental health issues that have arisen over the years as well as more mundane issues caused by confinement, and what the research can tell us about possible solutions.  Walter Campbell

 

50:202:365  Queer Crime (3) Queer crime and punishment in America. Nonfictional accounts of queer–lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender–criminality as well as policing and punishment of these queer identities. Examines myth, misunderstanding, and prejudices of queer identities, criminalization of queer behavior, and marginalization of queer offenders by the criminal justice system.  Gail Caputo

50:202:404  Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major.  Cheryl Hallman

 

 

Camden County College – Blackwood Campus

 

50:202:326  White Collar Crime (3) History and development of corporate crime, white-collar crime, political corruption, and other “upper-world” crimes. Emphasis on effective strategies for combating this phenomenon. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Ross Allen

 

*50:202:337  Inequality in Criminal Justice (D) (3) Examines the disproportionate representation of poor and racial minorities in the United States criminal justice system. Includes trends, policies, and issues concerning the effects of class and race on justice outcomes. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Augustine Isamah

 

50:202:342  Domestic Violence (3) Comprehensive overview of all forms of domestic violence and some of the variables such as race, gender, class, and sexual orientation that impact the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes. Specific topics may include intimate partner violence, elder abuse, sexual victimization, and battering. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status, or permission of instructor.  Christopher Auletto

 

50:202:354  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Special Topics in Criminal Investigations (3) This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the investigative procedures utilized by investigators when conducting a criminal investigation. Included are the duties and responsibilities of the detective such as the procedures of evidence collection, interview and interrogation, source-intelligence development, and covert investigative techniques. Additionally, case studies will be examined to provide students with a thorough understanding of the course objectives while enhancing in-class discussion.  Thomas McDonnell

 

50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:202:101.  Joseph DaGrossa

 

 

Atlantic Cape Community College – Mays Landing campus

 

50:202:312  Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement (3) Legal study of constitutional issues related to the administration of criminal justice as well as due process protections in the Bill of Rights. Basic constitutional principles of law enforcement as applied to issues such as search and seizure, interrogation, and arrest procedures.  Dean Wyks

 

50:202:327  Forensic Science: Theory and Practice (3) An introduction to forensic science from both an academic and practitioner viewpoint covering a range of forensic techniques, procedures and protocols. We will also cover evidence admissibility, the CSI effect, human rights, forensic regulation, standards, and quality control to gain a broader understanding of forensics’ role within criminal justice.  Cortney MacDonald

 

50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques.  Tracy Swan

 

50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:202:101.  Joseph DaGrossa

 

 

Raritan Valley Community – College Branchburg campus

 

50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques.  Nicole Sachs

 

50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:202:101.  Laura Salerno

 

 

Criminal Justice Graduate Program

 

56:202:520  Systems of Criminal Justice (3) Overview of theories of the criminal justice system as a whole, as well as theories dealing with individual criminal justice institutions (law enforcement, courts, and corrections). Identify important questions that research in this area has addressed, consider how empirical evidence has been generated, and take stock of the knowledge on these issues. Focus on policy issues in administration of the criminal justice system.  Richard Stansfield

 

56:202:600  Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3) Foundation in research methods commonly used in criminal justice and the social sciences. Includes conceptualization, operationalization, research method and design, sampling approaches, data collection, analysis, and ethics in research. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in research methods.  Sarah Tosh

 

56:202:673  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Community Corrections (3) Historical and philosophical overview of the theories behind alternatives to incarceration and their implementation in corrections. Emphasis on their impact and future. Bryn Herrschaft

 

56:202:675  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Solving Criminal Justice Issues (3) Solving issues like gang and gun violence; juvenile delinquency; drugs; and recidivism, require a collaborative governance approach, which involves government/criminal justice agencies, community, and private sectors working together to achieve more than any one sector could on its own. Learn how CJ agencies partner to prevent/reduce crime through this approach.  Tracy Swan