FALL 2022 COURSES

 

Listed below are all the undergraduate and graduate courses the department is offering in Fall 2022. Courses in all three disciplines offered on the Camden campus are listed first, followed by online courses, courses offered at our off-campus locations, and our graduate program on campus. Courses that satisfy a new general education requirement are denoted by an asterisk.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

*50:070:101  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (G) (R) (3) Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world.  Cynthia Saltzman 

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:202:101  Introduction to Criminal Justice (R) (3)  American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to post-conviction and release. Harry Rhea

 50:202:202  Police and Policing (3)  Explores the role of the police officer in the criminal justice system as well as the function of law enforcement in the United States. Includes historical foundations, trends, organizational structures, strategies, and issues concerning American police and policing. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Daniel Howard

50:202:203  Confinement and Corrections (3) History and organization of American corrections. Emphasis on sentencing, custodial institutions, intermediate sanctions, community corrections, and mechanisms for release. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201.  Ross Allen 

50:202:204  Criminal Courts (3) Structures and functions of American courts and law. Courtroom work group; roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel; trial, trial outcomes, and appellate courts. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201.  Harry Rhea 

*50:202:325  Violent Crime (W) (3) Discussion of gangs, homicide, serial crimes of violence, interpersonal violence, and rape. Emphasis on crimes involving weapon use. Prerequisite: 50:202:101.  Ross Allen 

50:202:327  Forensic Science: Theory, Expertise, and Practice (3) Since the late 19th century, forensic science has played an important role within criminal justice. Recent media attention has thrust forensics reluctantly into the spotlight to both positive and negative effect. This course aims to introduce the theoretical framework of forensic science from both an academic and practitioner viewpoint. Students will be familiarized with a range of forensic techniques, forensic terminology, and forensic procedures and protocols. We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of a number of common forensic techniques as well as the pitfalls of relying too heavily on forensic evidence. Finally, we will consider a number of related disciplines and issues, such as evidence admissibility, the CSI effect, human rights, and forensic regulation to gain a broader understanding of forensics’ modern role and future development within criminal justice.   Kimberlee Moran 

50:202:346 Children and Families of the Incarcerated (3) Connects research on the impact of parental incarceration, brain development, trauma, toxic stress, attachment, and resilience theories to the experiences of children of incarcerated parents and their families. Examines emerging best practices in serving children with incarcerated parents in education, health/mental health, child welfare, and corrections.  Ann Adalist-Estrin 

50:202:352 Community Corrections (3) Historical and philosophical overview of the theories behind alternatives to incarceration and their implementation in corrections. Emphasis on their impact and future. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201.  Bryn Herrschaft 

 50:202:355  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Forensic Interviewing (3) This three-credit course offers the undergraduate student understanding into the skills and knowledge needed to interview and assess suspects, witnesses and victims.  As a result of taking the course, students may expect to:  gain an understanding of interviewing techniques; identify their own blind spots and cultural biases; learn the basics of listening and responding through role play and demonstration of techniques; understand how to develop an assessment strategy; learn how to write a neutral, objective report.  Curt Watkins 

50:202:361  Criminal Law (3) Perspectives of leading attorneys or judges on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on criminal law as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:202:204.  Harry Rhea 

50:202:362  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Gangs of NY (3) Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:202:203. This course explores the intersections of crime and vice, law and order in 19th-century urban America. We will cover topics including the changes in law enforcement and imprisonment over time; the intersections of crime, poverty, and emerging industrialization; the development of organized policing; social reform movements; and the origins of the modern carceral state. We will read the stories of gamblers, prostitutes, pickpockets, thieves, conmen, and corrupt politicians, while considering the various social, political, economic, and cultural factors that encouraged their criminal activities. In addition, we will examine various responses by the state to control the urban underworld, including enacting legislation, establishing police forces, and launching reform efforts. Students will be asked to examine various primary and secondary sources, actively engage in class discussion, and write both short and long responses to the questions raised.  Wendy Woloson 

50:202:404  Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and instructor permission.  Cheryl Hallman 

 50:202:405 Criminal Investigation Practicum (3) Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Course may be repeated for 6 credits (only 3 credits can be counted toward electives for criminal justice majors). Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and instructor permission.  Kevin Murphy 

 50:202:420  International Criminal Law and Justice (3) Examines subject of international criminal justice, which includes the prosecution and punishment of crimes that shock the conscience of the international community, namely genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. History and development of international criminal justice, crimes established under international law, mechanisms of prosecuting perpetrators of international crimes, and general principles of international criminal law.  Harry Rhea 

 50:202:449  Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; and drug policy. Prerequisites: Senior status.  50:202:101 and 50:920:301.  Nathan Link 

 50:202:457  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Race and Policing (3)  Kayla Preito-Hodge 

 

 

  

SOCIOLOGY (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:920:101  Introduction to Sociology (R) (3) Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology.  Katherine Fredricks 

 50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques.  Kayla Preito-Hodge, Laura Napolitano 

50:920:306  Sociology of the Family (3) Examines family life in the United States through a sociological lens. Covers historic and current trends in American family life and provides an examination of how social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the family.  Laura Napolitano 

 50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207, or 50:202:101.  Richard Stansfield, Ross Allen 

 *50:920:316  Race and Ethnicity (D) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.  Augustine Isamah 

 *50:920:317  Race in Latin America (GCM) (3) Overview of race and race-mixing in Brazil and across the Americas. Interdisciplinary examination of forms of racial categorization, discrimination, and ideologies, whether in the form of nation-building projects, addressing racial inequality, or sexuality and family formation.  Cristina Escobar 

 50:920:325   Sociological Theory (3) An intensive study of the classical sociological thinkers–Marx, Durkheim, Weber–and a survey of contemporary theoretical traditions in the field. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207.  Joan Mazelis 

 50:920:329  Law and Society (3) Current social trends and legal developments. Topics include legal analysis, white-collar crime, and power and conflict.  Gram Crehan 

 50:920:348  Special Topics in Sociology: Masculinities (3) This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of masculinities. Moving past the conception of gender as a fixed biological category, the course addresses the emergence and representations of multiple masculinities in American culture along intersections with race, class, sexuality, and other areas of difference. It examines the ways diverse formations of masculinities function at the individual and collective level in various domains, such as in sports, family, relationships, subcultures, work and other social and physical sites. It addresses issues including the body, female and queer masculinities, maleness, boyhood, and violence. The course is interdisciplinary and will offer various contexts for exploring masculinities, such as academic and popular literature, film, and music.  Gail Caputo 

 50:920:418  Medical Sociology (3) Examines the distribution of health and disease and looks at the social organization of the health care system in contemporary society. Takes up the sociology of healing and therapy techniques and the interaction of patients and practitioners.  Joanna Cohen-Kallan 

 

ONLINE COURSES

 

50:070:307  Psychological Anthropology (3) Relation between sociocultural factors and psychological processes among members of different groups: socialization of the individual, culturally determined variations in personality structure, evaluation of theories of personality in light of cross-cultural evidence, and psychological factors in sociocultural change. Prerequisite: 50:070:101.  Patrick McCarty  

 *50:070:338  North American Indians (D) (3) History, cultural background, and contemporary situation of major North American Indian groups. Special attention to social relations, political and religious movements, and cultural change.  Patrick McCarty 

 50:202:202  Police and Policing (3) Explores the role of the police officer in the criminal justice system as well as the function of law enforcement in the United States. Includes historical foundations, trends, organizational structures, strategies, and issues concerning American police and policing. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201.  Olivia Crenny 

 50:202:354  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Police Community Relations and the Administration of Justice (3) This upper-level criminal justice class will focus on community-oriented policing, public relations, police organizations, and challenges to administering justice. Important issues affecting society and the criminal justice system as a whole will be examined in depth. Students will be expected to read scholarly work exploring these issues; participate in class discussions; conduct library research; write a senior level research paper; and demonstrate their understanding of assigned readings and discussion topics in a final examination. Brenna Stone 

50:202:355  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Innovative Policing Strategies (3) This course is a discussion of recent innovations in policing strategies, including the notion of defunding or abolishing police. This class has three goals: 1. To make sure students understand the standard model of policing, and the problems with it. 2. To make sure students understand the basic principals behind some of the more common or effective innovations in policing that aim to fix some of the problems with the standard model. 3. To make sure students have the knowledge to evaluate for themselves what a makes a good policing strategy, and thus whether an innovation in policing is likely to be beneficial. Walter Campbell 

 *50:202:365  Queer Crime (DIV) (3) Queer crime and punishment in America. Nonfictional accounts of queer–lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender–criminality as well as policing and punishment of these queer identities. Examines myth, misunderstanding, and prejudices of queer identities, criminalization of queer behavior, and marginalization of queer offenders by the criminal justice system.  Gail Caputo 

 *50:202:404  Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA)  Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Open to off-campus students only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Cheryl Hallman

 

CAMDEN COUNTY COLLEGE – BLACKWOOD CAMPUS

50:202:323  Varieties of Crime (3) Discussion of the many types of crime, ranging from victimless/morals offenses to property offenses to interpersonal crime. Emphasis on reduction policies. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201.  Erin Doherty 

 50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:202:101.  Joseph DaGrossa 

 *50:920:316  Race and Ethnicity (D) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.  Augustine Isamah 

 50:920:329  Law and Society (3) Current social trends and legal developments. Topics include legal analysis, white-collar crime, and power and conflict.  Ross Allen 

 

 

ATLANTIC CAPE COMMUNITY COLLEGE – MAYS LANDING CAMPUS

 

50:202:346Children and Families of the Incarcerated (3) Connects research on the impact of parental incarceration, brain development, trauma, toxic stress, attachment, and resilience theories to the experiences of children of incarcerated parents and their families. Examines emerging best practices in serving children with incarcerated parents in education, health/mental health, child welfare, and corrections.  Ann Adalist-Estrin 

 50:202:362  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Juvenile Justice in the 21st Century (3) Perspectives of leading attorneys or judges on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on criminal law as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:202:204. Dean Wyks 

 50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques.  Tracy Swan 

 50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:202:101.  Joseph DaGrossa 

 *50:920:316  Race and Ethnicity (D) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.  Augustine Isamah 

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE GRADUATE PROGRAM

 

56:202:600  Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3) Foundation in research methods commonly used in criminal justice and the social sciences. Includes conceptualization, operationalization, research method and design, sampling approaches, data collection, analysis, and ethics in research. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in research methods.  Gaylene Gordon 

 56:202:603  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Race and Policing (3)  Kayla Preito-Hodge 

 56:202:673  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Using Crime Data (3) The course introduces students to new ways to visualize, map, and explore spatial relationships in crime data. Students will review theoretical ideas of crime at local places, before reviewing both academic and professional reports using and displaying crime data to answer local policy questions. Students will develop their own research question to explore using mapping software.  Richard Stansfield 

 56:202:674  Special Topics in Juvenile Justice:  Children & Families of the Incarcerated (3) Connects research on the impact of parental incarceration, brain development, trauma, toxic stress, attachment, and resilience theories to the experiences of children of incarcerated parents and their families. Examines emerging best practices in serving children with incarcerated parents in education, health/mental health, child welfare, and corrections.  Ann Adalist-Estrin 

56:202:676  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Forensic Interviewing (3) This three-credit course offers the undergraduate student understanding into the skills and knowledge needed to interview and assess suspects, witnesses and victims.  As a result of taking the course, students may expect to:  gain an understanding of interviewing techniques; identify their own blind spots and cultural biases; learn the basics of listening and responding through role play and demonstration of techniques; understand how to develop an assessment strategy; learn how to write a neutral, objective report.  Curt Watkins 

56:202:677  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Investigation Practicum (3) Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports.  Kevin Murphy