Listed below are all the undergraduate and graduate courses the department is offering in Spring 2019. Courses in all three disciplines (Anthropology, Criminal Justice, and Sociology) offered on the Camden campus are listed first, followed by online courses, courses offered at our off-campus locations, and our Criminal Justice graduate program on campus.

Courses that satisfy a new general education requirement are denoted by an asterisk.

Anthropology (Camden Campus)

*50:070:213 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (GCM, G) (R) (3) Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world. Cindy Dell Clark

*50:070:340 Women, Men and Culture (GCM, G, D) (3) Sex roles compared in various societies, from hunting-and-gathering to modernizing and industrialized societies, including economic, political, and domestic roles; social status; personality; and sexuality. Approved elective for Gender Studies. Cynthia Saltzman

*50:070:346 Applied Anthropology (ECL) (3) Familiarizes students with the field of applied anthropology, its broadening sphere of influence in anthropology and research, and its unique methodological and conceptual contributions to practical issues. Students explore applied anthropology through readings and a hands-on project for a nonprofit community organization. Cindy Dell Clark

*50:070:356 People and Cultures of Africa (GCM, G) (3) Examines the processes of continuity and change in Africa today and Africa’s relationship to globalization through the Atlantic slave trade, European colonization, the drilling and production of materials like oil and coffee, and international migration. Focuses on the major institutions of kinship and family, economics, politics, and religion, and on contemporary issues such as socioeconomic development, urbanization, gender, and youth. Cati Coe

Criminal Justice (Camden Campus)

50:202:201 Criminal Justice in American Society (R) (3) American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to post conviction and release. Richard Stansfield

50:202:203 Confinement and Corrections (3) History and organization of American corrections. Emphasis on sentencing, custodial institutions, intermediate sanctions, community corrections, and mechanisms for release. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Stephen Moore

50:202:312 Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement (3) Legal study of constitutional issues related to the administration of criminal justice as well as due process protections in the Bill of Rights. Basic constitutional principles of law enforcement as applied to issues such as search and seizure, interrogation, and arrest procedures. Harry Rhea

50:202:315 Cyber Crime (3) Overview of modern trends in crime involving computers and the internet. Topics include types of computer-based offenses, legal issues relating to cybercrime, topics in cyber criminology, and contemporary issues involving computer hacking and internet-related crime. Dan Semenza

50:202:320 National Security Risk Assessment and Analysis (3) Explores the various risks posed by threats to national and global security, including threats from terrorist organizations, and what plans and strategies have been put in place to mitigate these risks and protect various infrastructures, such as transportation, energy, nuclear facilities, and information systems. The course will also examine risk assessment methodology and its application to national security policy. Approved elective for National Security Certificate program. Dan Howard

50:202:323 Varieties of Crime (3) Discussion of the many types of crime, ranging from victimless/morals offenses to property offenses to interpersonal crime. Emphasis on reduction policies. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Ross Allen

*50:202:337 Poor, Minorities & Justice (D, DIV) (3) Examines the disproportionate representation of poor and racial minorities in the United States criminal justice system. Includes trends, policies, and issues concerning the effects of class and race on justice outcomes. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Dian Williams

50:202:346 Children and Families of the Incarcerated (3) Connects research on the impact of parental incarceration, brain development, trauma, toxic stress, attachment, and resilience theories to the experiences of children of incarcerated parents and their families. Examines emerging best practices in serving children with incarcerated parents in education, health/mental health, child welfare, and corrections. Ann Adalist-Estrin

50:202:361 Topics in Criminal Law (3) This course studies the role of local, state, federal, and international criminal law.  The fundamental principles and functions of substantive criminal law are explored, as well as their impact on national and international communities. Reasons for punishing convicted criminals, in addition to elements of crimes and defenses are studied.  Other general doctrines of criminal liability, such as complicity, causation, attempt, and conspiracy, and crime grading (homicide) are also covered. Prerequisites: 50:202:201 and 204. Harry Rhea

*50:202:372 Gender Advocacy and Juvenile Justice II (3) This course is the second of a two-course sequence intended to provide an advocacy intervention model for at-risk and justice system-involved girls. During this second course in the sequence, students will be paired with individual girls to work with them as advocates to help them achieve goals the girls identify. Over the course of the semester, students will spend 6-8 hours a week engaged in assisting the girls in attaining these goals, working toward the objective of equipping the girls with skills needed to advocate for themselves. Students will attend weekly supervision with the course instructor. Prerequisite: 50:202:363 – Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: Gender and Juvenile Justice taken in Fall 2018. Instruction permission required.  Michelle Meloy 

*50:202:375 Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: Comparative Criminal Justice in U.K. (G) (3) A course designed to teach students about the similarities and differences between the United States and other countries regarding the entire criminal justice system; courts, police (law enforcement), and corrections. Students will travel to London, Edinburgh, Belfast and Dublin March 14-24. Class meets 2/1, 2/15, 3/8, 4/5, and 4/12. Ross Allen

*50:202:375 Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: The Hague, The Netherlands (G) (3) A course designed to teach students about multilateral mechanisms established for the prosecution of transnational and international crimes, such as terrorism, human trafficking, genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. This course, with the study abroad component, will serve as a way for students to see, first hand, many of the contributing factors that helped design the European and international criminal justice systems. Harry Rhea

50:202:404 Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Prerequisite: 50:202:201 Cheryl Hallman

50:202:410 Research Seminar in Criminal Justice (3) Independent research or special project under faculty supervision. Instruction permission required. Kurt Fowler

50:202:420 International Criminal Law and Justice (3) Examines subject of international criminal justice, which includes the prosecution and punishment of crimes that shock the conscience of the international community, namely genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. History and development of international criminal justice, crimes established under international law, mechanisms of prosecuting perpetrators of international crimes, and general principles of international criminal law. Harry Rhea

50:202:449 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; and drug policy. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:201 and 50:920:301.  Nathan Link

50:202:457 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Prisoner Reentry: Legal Issues (3) This course provides students with opportunities to develop practical and community engagement skills while assisting individuals with expungement and related legal issues.  Students will design and conduct community education sessions about prisoner reentry legal issues.  Students will also hold “speed screening sessions” to assist community members with determining expungement eligibility.  Students will also have an opportunity to advocate for clients seeking expungement of criminal convictions.  Course is taught at Rutgers Law School. Instructor permission required. Meredith Schalick

Sociology (Camden Campus)

 

50:920:198 Lab in Writing (0) Lab associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education writing requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted. Chinyere Osuji

50:920:207 Introduction to Sociology (R) (3) Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology.  Chinyere Osuji, Joanna Cohen Kallan

50:920:208 Contemporary Social Problems (R) (3) Survey of contemporary social problems with particular attention to how social issues become defined as “problems” and to how sociological knowledge can inform social policy choices. Topics include poverty, discrimination, family breakup, crime, mental illness, alcoholism, and others. Non-majors may choose to take this course as a beginning course in sociology. Katrina Hazzard-Donald

50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Students taking this course must also register for a recitation section (50:920:302). Laura Napolitano, Kurt Fowler

50:920:302 Methods and Techniques of Social Research Recitation (1) Review concepts covered in 50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research. Develop required literature review and research proposal. Provide assistance in mastering APA style, understanding the structure and content of a social science research paper, conducting library searches, and developing strategies for academic success. Co-requisite: 50:920:301. Erin Doherty, Gaylene Gordon, Deona Edgerton

50:920:306 Sociology of the Family (3) Examines family life in the United States through a sociological lens. Covers historic and current trends in American family life and provides an examination of how social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the family. Laura Napolitano

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:202:201. Richard Stansfield, Kurt Fowler

50:920:329 Law and Society (3) Current social trends and legal developments. Topics include legal analysis, white-collar crime, and power and conflict. Margaret Crehan

*50:920:332 Social Stratification (ECL) (3) Analyzes class inequality and the class structure in U.S. society, with particular attention to the processes which generate, reproduce, and change social and economic inequalities, as well as the consequences of inequality. When offered with a lab, this course has a mandatory engaged civic learning component (ECL), included in a 1-credit lab section, making the course worth a total of 4 credits rather than 3. In those circumstances, all students must register for the course and one lab section; the 1-credit lab section is a co-requisite. Prerequisite: 50:920:207. Co-requisite: 1-credit lab section required. Joan Mazelis

50:920:345 Sociology of Education (3) Examines the interaction between schools and society. Explores socialization, the development of mass education, cultural differences and classroom interactions, the relationship between schooling and stratification, school funding and segregation, schools as social organizations in terms of bureaucratic procedures, authority, identity, and student peer networks. Cati Coe

50:920:347 Special Topics in Sociology: Social Stratification Lab (1) This course is a co-requisite for 920:332:01, Social Stratification, and represents the mandatory engaged civic learning component (ECL) of the course. Students register for this course, which automatically registers them into 920:332:01. Joan Mazelis

50:920:348 Special Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Jazz (3) The American musical genre known as “Jazz” has fascinated, captivated, inspired and pleased listeners and audiences worldwide for over a century. Using readings, lectures, media materials, and discussions, this course will examine theories and problems in the sociological analysis, history and development of the American music known as Jazz. Using both a psychobiographical and sociohistorical approach, this course will examine the lives and musical times of landmark innovators as they create and interact in a world stratified by class, and race – impacted by gender, education and religion. Katrina Hazzard-Donald

*50:920:357 Individual and Society (W) (3) The individual’s relationship to society and society’s impact on the individual. Topics include Western notions of the self and the relationship to capitalism, class, and the family; conceptions of the person in other parts of the world (such as Bali, Japan, and Samoa); symbolic interaction and how the self is constituted in social interaction; the performance of the self in everyday life; framing of social experience through play and ritual; and being another through spirit possession. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:070:213. Chinyere Osuji

50:920:418 Medical Sociology (3) Examines the distribution of health and disease and looks at the social organization of the health care system in contemporary society. Takes up the sociology of healing and therapy techniques and the interaction of patients and practitioners. Jen Hao Chen

 

Online Courses

*50:070:338 North American Indians (D, HAC, DIV) (3) History, cultural background, and contemporary situation of major North American Indian groups. Special attention to social relations, political and religious movements, and cultural change. Patrick McCarty

50:070:385 Special Topics in Anthropology: Anthropological Theory (3) This course will cover the major theories in anthropology, starting with the development and rise of anthropological theory in the late 19th century (e.g. Evolutionism) and continuing with contemporary developments in theory (e.g. Poststructuralism and Postmodernism). It will include theories by leading anthropologists such as Boas, Malinowski, Mead, Levi Strauss, Geertz and Bourdieu. Patrick McCarty

50:202:304 Death Penalty (3) History of capital punishment and contemporary use of the death penalty, including trends and statistics. Problems and issues pertaining to capital punishment, constitutional challenges to the death penalty, and the current state of capital jurisprudence. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Brenna Stone

50:202:354 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Justice Policy Issues (3) In this class, students will learn about the impact of select criminal justice policies, programs, or reports. They will also learn the skills necessary to assess other criminal justice policies, programs, or reports. Walter Campbell

50:202:404 Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major.  Cheryl Hallman

 

Blackwood campus – Camden County College

*50:202:305 Critical Issues in Criminal Justice (3) This course will focus on the relationships that exist between ethics and justice as it is manifested in the contemporary criminal justice system. The topics to be discussed include punishment and sentencing, rights of those who are traditionally oppressed, the so-called “blue wall of silence” among police, privatization of criminal justice components, and the death penalty. Additionally, students will be expected to critically think about ethical reasoning as it pertains to justice and injustice and what shapes their viewpoints in this area. This is a writing intensive course. Ross Allen

50:202:449 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Tracy Swan

50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Kurt Fowler

*50:920:316 Race and Ethnicity (D, DIV) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context. Augustine Isamah

 

Mays Landing campus – Atlantic Cape Community College

 

50:202:312 Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement (3) Legal study of constitutional issues related to the administration of criminal justice as well as due process protections in the Bill of Rights. Basic constitutional principles of law enforcement as applied to issues such as search and seizure, interrogation, and arrest procedures. Dean Wyks

50:202:323 Varieties of Crime (3) Discussion of the many types of crime, ranging from victimless/morals offenses to property offenses to interpersonal crime. Emphasis on reduction policies. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Brianna Chrzanowski

*50:202:337 Poor, Minorities and Justice (D, DIV) (3) Examines the disproportionate representation of poor and racial minorities in the United States criminal justice system. Includes trends, policies, and issues concerning the effects of class and race on justice outcomes. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Augustine Isamah 

50:202:342 Domestic Violence (3) Comprehensive overview of all forms of domestic violence and some of the variables such as race, gender, class, and sexual orientation that impact the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes. Specific topics may include intimate partner violence, elder abuse, sexual victimization, and battering. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status, or permission of instructor. Christopher Auletto

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:202:201. Joseph DaGrossa

 

Joint Base McGuire-Fort Dix campus

 

50:202:319 Narcoterrorism (3) Examines the intersection between narcotics and terrorism, paying special attention to the fiscal basis of terrorism, threats to national and international security, and related crimes including trafficking in drugs and arms. Assesses profiles and ideologies of narcoterrorists with an additional emphasis on policing global narcoterrorism. Daniel Brown

50:202:352 Community Corrections (3) Historical and philosophical overview of the theories behind alternatives to incarceration and their implementation in corrections. Emphasis on their impact and future. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Richard Antonison

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:202:201. Joseph DaGrossa

 

Branchburg campus – Raritan Valley Community College

 

50:202:355 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Sexual Crimes (3) The course will cover offenders and victims of sexual crimes and assaults across different contexts. Topics will include sexual crimes against minors, sexual crimes in cults and/or extremist groups, sexual assaults in intimate relationships, and sexual assaults by strangers. Risk factors for sexual assaults will also be discussed, as will the history of prevention and treatment efforts for both victims and offenders. The course will also cover offenders’ motives for sexual assault. The last portion of the class will be dedicated to sexual assault on college campuses and prevention efforts to combat this specific type of violence. Nicole Sachs

50:202:449 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Henri Buccine-Schraeder

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:202:201. Laura Salerno

 

Criminal Justice Graduate Program

56:202:500 Policy Analysis in Criminal Justice (3) A research- and writing-oriented seminar that will prepare students for conducting criminal justice policy analysis. Topics include the role of interest groups and organizational participants in the policy process, types of policies, and models of policy research. Examined are current criminal justice policies using analysis that considers the development, implementation, and evaluation of policy (i.e., what has occurred in policy, why, and at what benefits or costs). Also covered is policy formulation, which involves the development of new policy options to remedy public problems. Brynn Herrschaft

 

56:202:601 Data Analysis in Criminal Justice (3) This course provides students with a grounding in the basic tools used in quantitative analysis in the field of criminal justice along with an introduction to the statistical issues involved in the design and logic of research. Students learn to use various nonparametric measures of association as well as parametric tests of significance and are introduced to the fundamentals of correlation, regression, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistics. Jane Siegel

56:202:674 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: Gender and Juvenile Justice II (3) ) This course is the second of a two-course sequence intended to provide an advocacy intervention model for at-risk and justice system-involved girls. During this second course in the sequence, students will be paired with individual girls to work with them as advocates to help them achieve goals the girls identify. Over the course of the semester, students will spend 6-8 hours a week engaged in assisting the girls in attaining these goals, working toward the objective of equipping the girls with skills needed to advocate for themselves. Students will attend weekly supervision with the course instructor. Prerequisite: 50:202:363 – Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: Gender and Juvenile Justice taken in Fall 2018. Instruction permission required. Michelle Meloy

56:202:674 Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: Youth Violence (3) This course will study youth violence and some of its antecedents and consequences through the lenses of race, place, class, gender, and age. Through readings that focus on youth issues, urban and suburban ecologies, and delinquency, we will consider how prominent themes in youth studies such as vulnerability and agency, dependence and independence, and responsibility and irresponsibility intersect with youth violence. Diane Marano

56:202:675 Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: Comparative Criminal Justice in U.K. (G) (3) A course designed to teach students about the similarities and differences between the United States and other countries regarding the entire criminal justice system; courts, police (law enforcement), and corrections. Students will travel to London, Edinburgh, Belfast and Dublin March 14-24. Class meets 2/1, 2/15, 3/8, 4/5, and 4/12. Ross Allen

56:202:675 Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: International Criminal Justice at the Hague (3) A course designed to teach students about multilateral mechanisms established for the prosecution of transnational and international crimes, such as terrorism, human trafficking, genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. This course, with the study abroad component, will serve as a way for students to see, first hand, many of the contributing factors that helped design the European and international criminal justice systems. Harry Rhea