Listed below are all the undergraduate and graduate courses the department is offering in Fall 2018. Courses in all three disciplines offered on the Camden campus are listed first, followed by online courses, courses offered at our off-campus locations (CCC-Blackwood, ACCC-Mays Landing, Joint Base McGuire-Fort Dix, and RVCC-Branchburg) and our graduate program on campus.

*Courses that satisfy a new general education requirement are denoted by an asterisk*

Undergraduate Programs – Rutgers–Camden Campus

Anthropology 

*50:070:213 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (GCM) (R) (3) Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world. Cati Coe

*50:070:307 Psychological Anthropology (PLS) (3) Relation between sociocultural factors and psychological processes among members of different groups: socialization of the individual, culturally determined variations in personality structure, evaluation of theories of personality in light of cross-cultural evidence, and psychological factors in sociocultural change. Prerequisite: 50:070:213. Patrick McCarty

50:070:313 Childhood Health and Illness (3) Introduces issues and trends facing health care professionals, policymakers, and researchers involved in the health, medical care, and treatment of persons under 18 years. Addresses major health problems faced by children; how illness relates to a child’s developing selfhood; children’s knowledge about such issues as health, illness, death, and bodily functions; how care should be given to best serve children’s physical, emotional, and cognitive needs; and health policy related to children’s well-being.  Cindy Clark

50:070:321 Death and Dying (G) (3) Death, dying, and bereavement in a variety of cultures as contexts for understanding the relation between biological and social processes, society and the individual, technology and social change, and socialization and communications. Application of research results in the area of death and dying for improved care of the dying and the bereaved.  Cindy Clark

*50:070:345 Immigration and Families (GCM) (3) Examines how migration affects families and family life, for both those who migrate and those who do not, with particular focus on new forms of immigration to the United States since 1965. Topics include political, economic, and social forces that motivate migration; impact of U.S. culture, law, and policy on immigrants’ traditions; assimilation and family life; and issues related to maintaining family structure and ties transnationally.  Cati Coe

Criminal Justice 

50:202:178 MOUNTAINVIEW SEMINAR: ISSUES IN REENTRY AND RETENTIONChris Agans Enrollment by instructor permission. Seminar for participants in the Mountainview program.

50:202:196 Lab in Engaged Civic Learning (0) Lab associated with specific courses so that students receive credit for meeting the general education engaged civic learning requirement. Students are not required to attend a lab in addition to the associated course unless otherwise noted. Section 1 is linked to 202:363 – Topics in Juvenile Justice; Section 2 is linked to 202:370 – Mass Incarceration, Re-entry and Justice.  Jane Siegel, Nathan Link

50:202:201 Criminal Justice in American Society (R) (3) American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to post conviction and release. Ross Allen

50:202:202 Police and Policing (3) Explores the role of the police officer in the criminal justice system as well as the function of law enforcement in the United States. Includes historical foundations, trends, organizational structures, strategies, and issues concerning American police and policing. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Dan Howard

50:202:204 Courts and Criminal Law (3) Structures and functions of American courts and law. Courtroom work group; roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel; trial, trial outcomes, and appellate courts. Prerequisite: 50:202:201.  Harry Rhea

50:202:310 Juvenile Delinquency (3) Examines the nature, extent, causes and correlates of youth crime. Topics include the legal status of youth; the measurement of delinquency; the types of offenses youth commonly commit; gender and delinquency; and the role of education, families, peers, and gangs in delinquency.  The course will also examine the philosophy and development of preventive and rehabilitative programs. Dan Semenza

50:202:319 Narcoterrorism (3) Examines the intersection between narcotics and terrorism, paying special attention to the fiscal basis of terrorism, threats to national and international security, and related crimes including trafficking in drugs and arms. Assesses profiles and ideologies of narcoterrorists with an additional emphasis on policing global narcoterrorism. Dan Brown

50:202:325 Violent Crime (3) Discussion of gangs, homicide, serial crimes of violence, interpersonal violence, and rape. Emphasis on crimes involving weapon use.  Dan Semenza

50:202:345 Comparative Criminal Justice (3) Comparative Criminal Justice is broadly concerned with the study of criminal justice systems from a comparative perspective. It considers criminal justice systems from a range of jurisdictions with a view to highlighting the merits and drawbacks of these systems. The course broadly explores the fact that crimes can often be described as a social construct, because they can differ according to the nation state’s own definition of what it wishes to define as criminal. The course reviews the various methods of comparison, from the approaches that can be taken when studying criminal justice policy, the tools used to complete field work, the ability to critically consider crime and punishment statistics from a number of jurisdictions to an identification and review of the key philosophies, aims and values of criminal justice systems around the world. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Harry Rhea

50:202:348 Practicum: Creating Resources on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at the National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated at Rutgers-Camden (3) Provides students with an opportunity to be part of a program that spans three decades in providing resources on children and families of the incarcerated. Opportunities for students include gathering and disseminating current research and resources, identifying policy and practice initiatives across the country, tracking the needs of programs and systems, requesting information, participating in public awareness campaigns, and collaboration in planning for NRCCFI events and activities. Ann Adalist-Estrin

50:202:363 Topics in Juvenile Justice: Gender and Juvenile Justice (3) Course will examine the juvenile justice system and the role of gender in it, including examination of effective evidence-based programs for girls. Students will work on projects designed to provide services to girls in detention or on probation in Camden County. In the spring, students will have an opportunity to take a second class in which they will implement the programs designed in this class by working with the girls themselves.  Jane Siegel

50:202:370 Mass Incarceration, Reentry & Justice (3) Examines the social, political, and economic forces behind the rise in mass incarceration; the processes of incarceration, release and reentry to the community with a focus on the collateral health and social consequences for former prisoners, their families, and communities; and, promising reform initiatives geared toward addressing the issue of mass incarceration and the difficulties faced by prisoners when re-entering their communities. Students will also be equipped with practical training and will participate in a community outreach effort to educate Camden residents about the process of getting their criminal records expunged. Prerequisite: 50:202:201 Nathan Link

50:202:404 Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Prerequisite: 50:202:201 Cheryl Hallman

50:202:405 Criminal Investigation Practicum (3) Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Course may be repeated for 6 credits (only 3 credits can be counted toward electives for criminal justice majors). Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: 50:202:201 and instructor permission.  Kevin Murphy

50:202:410 Research Seminar in Criminal Justice (3) Independent research or special project under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Kurt Fowler

50:202:449 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3)

The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; and drug policy. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:201 and 50:920:301.  Nathan Link

Sociology 

50:920:207 Introduction to Sociology (R) (3) Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology. Joanna Cohen, Joan Mazelis

50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Kurt Fowler, Laura Napolitano

50:920:302 Methods and Techniques of Social Research Recitation (1) Review concepts covered in 50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research. Develop required literature review and research proposal. Provide assistance in mastering APA style, understanding the structure and content of a social science research paper, conducting library searches, and developing strategies for academic success. Corequisite: 50:920:301. Erin Doherty, Deona Edgerton, Gaylene Gordon

50:920:306 Sociology of the Family (3) Examines family life in the United States through a sociological lens. Covers historic and current trends in American family life and provides an examination of how social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the family.  Laura Napolitano, Augustine Isamah

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:202:201. Kurt Fowler, Richard Stansfield

*50:920:316 Race and Ethnicity (DIV) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.   Katrina Hazzard-Donald

*50:920:317 Race in Latin America (GCM) (3) Overview of race and race-mixing in Brazil and across the Americas. Interdisciplinary examination of forms of racial categorization, discrimination, and ideologies, whether in the form of nation-building projects, addressing racial inequality, or sexuality and family formation.   Chinyere Osuji

50:920:325 Sociological Theory (3) An intensive study of the classical sociological thinkers–Marx, Durkheim, Weber–and a survey of contemporary theoretical traditions in the field. Prerequisite: 50:920:207.  Joan Mazelis

*50:920:337 Women and Men in Society (DIV) (3) A comparative and historical examination of gender and inequality. A look at gender roles within the family, the workforce, and the legal system; socialization and gender; and sexuality and gender.  Cynthia Saltzman

50:920:435 Sociology of W.E.B. DuBois (3) Examines the sociology of one of the most prominent sociologists and scholar activists in United States history. Students will explore the “three faces of DuBois,” whose research and writings as a sociologist, literary scholar, and historian linked European philosophy, historiography, and social science to American sociology. Katrina Hazzard-Donald

50:920:445 Special Topics in Sociology: Interracial and Interethnic Dynamics (3) Examines the dynamics of relationships between different racial and ethnic groups.  Chinyere Osuji 

Undergraduate Online Courses

50:202:355 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Innovative Policing Strategies (3) Overview of recent innovations in policing strategies. Topics will include the standard model of policing and the problems associated with it as well as the basic principles behind common or effective innovations in policing that aim to fix some of those problems. Course is also intended to provide students with the knowledge to evaluate for themselves what a makes a good policing strategy, and thus whether an innovation in policing is likely to be beneficial. Walter Campbell

* 50:202:365 Queer Crime (DIV) (3) Queer crime and punishment in America. Nonfictional accounts of queer–lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender–criminality as well as policing and punishment of these queer identities. Examines myth, misunderstanding, and prejudices of queer identities, criminalization of queer behavior, and marginalization of queer offenders by the criminal justice system.  Gail Caputo

50:202:404 Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA) Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Cheryl Hallman

50:920:207 Introduction to Sociology (R) (3) Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology.  Joanna Cohen

50:920:348 Special Topics in Sociology: Masculinities (3) This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of masculinities. Moving past the conception of gender as a fixed biological category, the course addresses the emergence and representations of multiple masculinities in American culture along intersections with race, class, sexuality, and other areas of difference. It examines the ways diverse formations of masculinities function at the individual and collective level in various domains, such as in sports, family, relationships, subcultures, work and other social and physical sites. It addresses issues including the body, female and queer masculinities, maleness, boyhood, and violence. The course is interdisciplinary and will offer various contexts for exploring masculinities, such as academic and popular literature, film, and music. Gail Caputo

Undergraduate Courses at the Blackwood campus – Camden County College

50:202:312 Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement (3) Legal study of constitutional issues related to the administration of criminal justice as well as due process protections in the Bill of Rights. Basic constitutional principles of law enforcement as applied to issues such as search and seizure, interrogation, and arrest procedures. Robert Del Sordo

50:202:352 Community Corrections (3) Historical and philosophical overview of the theories behind alternatives to incarceration and their implementation in corrections. Emphasis on their impact and future. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Bryn Herrschaft-Eckm

50:202:354 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Investigations (3) The fundamental principles and procedures utilized during criminal investigations will be examined during this course.  Topics will include the proper handling of evidence, interviews and interrogations, and specific criminal investigations will be examined. Chris Auletto

50:920:313 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3) Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:207 or 50:202:201. Kurt Fowler

Undergraduate Courses at the Mays Landing campus – Atlantic Cape Community College

50:202:318 Cyber Terrorism (3) — Examines the impact of technology, computers, and the Internet on state and global terrorism, as well as with international conflicts.  Topics to be discussed include the roles that computers and the Internet play in terrorist organizations’ recruitment and communications; state-sponsored cyber warfare; the role of technology in the way that terrorist organizations relate to the world; and the technology mechanisms that terrorists could employ to attack the infrastructure and physical safety of Americans and the citizens of other Western nations. Doug Green

50:202:326 White-Collar Crime (3) History and development of corporate crime, white-collar crime, political corruption, and other “upper-world” crimes. Emphasis on effective strategies for combating this phenomenon. Prerequisite: 50:202:201. Dean Wyks

50:202:449 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3) The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:201 and 50:920:301.  Tracy Swan

50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques.  Joe DaGrossa

*50:920:316 Race and Ethnicity (DIV) (3) The social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States and around the globe. The formation of racial and ethnic identities and the varieties of group interaction, including prejudice, discrimination, assimilation, institutional domination, and change. Changing concepts, boundaries, and interrelationships within a global context.   Augustine Isamah

Undergraduate Courses at the Joint Base McGuire-Fort Dix campus

50:202:325 Violent Crime (W) (3) Discussion of gangs, homicide, serial crimes of violence, interpersonal violence, and rape. Emphasis on crimes involving weapon use. Prerequisite: 50:202:201.  Ross Allen

50:202:362 Topics in Corrections (3) Perspectives of correctional practitioners on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on corrections as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:201 and 203.(Contemporary Issues in Corrections) Joe DaGrossa

Undergraduate Courses at the Branchburg campus – Raritan Valley Community College

50:202:323 Varieties of Crime (3) Discussion of the many types of crime, ranging from victimless/morals offenses to property offenses to interpersonal crime. Emphasis on reduction policies. Prerequisite: 50:202:201.  Nicole Sachs

50:920:301 Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3) Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Laura Salerno

Criminal Justice Graduate Program

56:202:520 Systems of Criminal Justice (3) Overview of theories of the criminal justice system as a whole, as well as theories dealing with individual criminal justice institutions (law enforcement, courts, and corrections). Identify important questions that research in this area has addressed, consider how empirical evidence has been generated, and take stock of the knowledge on these issues. Focus on policy issues in administration of the criminal justice system.  Richard Stansfield

56:202:600 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3) Foundation in research methods commonly used in criminal justice and the social sciences. Includes conceptualization, operationalization, research method and design, sampling approaches, data collection, analysis, and ethics in research. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in research methods.  Joanna Cohen

56:202:673:01 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Investigation Practicum (3) Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Kevin Murphy

56:202:673:02 Special Topics in Criminal Justice: International Criminal Justice (3) Examines the subject of international criminal justice, which includes the prosecution and punishment of crimes that shock the conscience of the international community, namely genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. During the course, students will explore the history and development of international criminal justice, crimes established under international law, the mechanisms of prosecuting perpetrators of international crimes, and the general principles of international criminal law. Harry Rhea

56:202:674 Topics in Juvenile Justice: Gender and Juvenile Justice (3) Course will examine the juvenile justice system and the role of gender in it, including examination of effective evidence-based programs for girls. Students will work on projects designed to provide services to girls in detention or on probation in Camden County. In the spring, students will have an opportunity to take a second class in which they will implement the programs designed in this class by working with the girls themselves.  Jane Siegel