SPRING 2022 COURSES

 

Listed below are all the undergraduate and graduate courses the department is offering in Spring 2022. Courses in all three disciplines offered on the Camden campus are listed first, followed by online courses, courses offered at our off-campus locations, and our graduate program on campus. Courses that satisfy a new general education requirement are denoted by an asterisk.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

*50:070:101  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (G) (R) (3)  Introduces the student to the study of culture. Topics include the nature and diversity of culture among different peoples; the fieldwork process; cultural change; political, economic, and social organizations; worldview and values; socialization; social and religious movements; and applications of anthropology to the contemporary world. Cindy Dell Clark

*50:070:321  Death and Dying (G) (3)  Death, dying, and bereavement in a variety of cultures as contexts for understanding the relation between biological and social processes, society and the individual, technology and social change, and socialization and communications. Application of research results in the area of death and dying for improved care of the dying and the bereaved. Cindy Dell Clark

 50:070:345  Immigration and Families (3)  Examines how migration affects families and family life, for both those who migrate and those who do not, with particular focus on new forms of immigration to the United States since 1965. Topics include political, economic, and social forces that motivate migration; impact of U.S. culture, law, and policy on immigrants’ traditions; assimilation and family life; and issues related to maintaining family structure and ties transnationally. Cristina Escobar

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:202:101  Introduction to Criminal Justice (R) (3)  American crime and criminal justice agencies, i.e., police, courts, and correctional agencies. Emphasis on criminal justice as a system and the processing of persons accused of a crime from the point of arrest to post-conviction and release. Harry Rhea

 50:202:202  Police and Policing (3)  Explores the role of the police officer in the criminal justice system as well as the function of law enforcement in the United States. Includes historical foundations, trends, organizational structures, strategies, and issues concerning American police and policing. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Daniel Howard

 50:202:204  Criminal Courts (3)  Structures and functions of American courts and law. Courtroom workgroup; roles of attorneys, judges, and other court personnel; trial, trial outcomes, and appellate courts. Prerequisite: 50:202:201 or 50:202:201. Harry Rhea

 50:202:323  Varieties of Crime (3)  Discussion of the many types of crime, ranging from victimless/morals offenses to property offenses to interpersonal crime. Emphasis on reduction policies. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Ross Allen

 *50:202:337  Inequality in Criminal Justice (D) (3)  Examines the disproportionate representation of poor and racial minorities in the United States criminal justice system. Includes trends, policies, and issues concerning the effects of class and race on justice outcomes. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Sarah Tosh

 50:202:348  Practicum: National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated  (3)  Provides students with an opportunity to be part of a program that spans three decades in providing resources on children and families of the incarcerated. Opportunities for students include gathering and disseminating current research and resources, identifying policy and practice initiatives across the country, tracking the needs of programs and systems, requesting information, participating in public awareness campaigns, and collaboration in planning for NRCCFI events and activities. Ann Adalist-Estrin

 50:202:361  Criminal Law (3)  Perspectives of leading attorneys or judges on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on criminal law as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:202:204. Harry Rhea

 50:202:370  Mass Incarceration, Re-entry and Justice (3)  This course examines three components related to mass incarceration in the United States: 1) the social, political, and economic forces behind the rise in mass imprisonment; 2) the processes of incarceration and returning home–or “prisoner reentry”–with a focus on the collateral health and social consequences for former prisoners, their families, and communities; and 3) the promising multilevel reform initiatives geared toward addressing the issue of mass incarceration and the difficulties faced by prisoners when reentering their communities. As this is an Engaged Civic Learning course, students will be equipped with practical training and will participate in a community outreach effort to educate Camden residents about the process of getting their criminal records expunged. Nathan Link

*50:202:375  Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: Comparative Criminal Justice in U.K. (G) (3)  A course focusing on crime and justice of a foreign country. Includes regular class meetings, required readings, and written assignments, as well as a short-term learning/service experience in a foreign country. Ross Allen

50:202:404  Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA)  Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and instructor permission. Cheryl Hallman

50:202:405 Criminal Investigation Practicum (3)  Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Course may be repeated for 6 credits (only 3 credits can be counted toward electives for criminal justice majors). Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: 50:202:201 or 50:202:201 and instructor permission.  Kevin Murphy

50:202:420  International Criminal Law and Justice (3)  Examines subject of international criminal justice, which includes the prosecution and punishment of crimes that shock the conscience of the international community, namely genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. History and development of international criminal justice, crimes established under international law, mechanisms of prosecuting perpetrators of international crimes, and general principles of international criminal law. Harry Rhea

50:202:449  Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3)  The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Nathan Link

  

SOCIOLOGY (CAMDEN CAMPUS)

 

50:920:101  Introduction to Sociology (R) (3)  Introduction to the study of social groups and societies. Basic sociological methods and theoretical perspectives. Survey of basic subfields of sociology, such as socialization, family, religion, inequality, race and ethnicity, politics, deviance, and social change. The department recommends that students wishing to take advanced courses begin with Introduction to Sociology. Joanna Cohen Kallan

 50:920:208  Contemporary Social Problems (R) (3)  Survey of contemporary social problems with particular attention to how social issues become defined as “problems” and to how sociological knowledge can inform social policy choices. Topics include poverty, discrimination, family breakup, crime, mental illness, alcoholism, and others. Non-majors may choose to take this course as a beginning course in sociology. Katrina Hazzard-Donald

 50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3)  Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Laura Napolitano

50:920:306  Sociology of the Family (3)  Examines family life in the United States through a sociological lens. Covers historic and current trends in American family life and provides an examination of how social class, race/ethnicity, and gender impact the family. Laura Napolitano

50:920:313  Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3)  Explanation of crime and delinquency in American society. Topics include deterrence theory, biological explanations for crime, sociological theories, and conflict-based theories. Emphasis on social causes of crime. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207 or 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Richard Stansfield

 50:920:332  Inequality in the United States (3)  Analyzes class inequality and the class structure in U.S. society, with particular attention to the processes which generate, reproduce, and change social and economic inequalities, as well as the consequences of inequality. When offered with a lab, this course has a mandatory engaged civic learning component (ECL), included in a 1-credit lab section, making the course worth a total of 4 credits rather than 3. In those circumstances, all students must register for the course and one lab section, and the 1-credit lab section is a corequisite. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207. Joan Mazelis

50:920:344  Sociology of Deviance (3)  Explanations for deviance and conformity. Emphasis on varieties of deviance; social reactions to deviance, including moral panics; and sociological theories. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 or 50:920:101 or 50:920:207. Sarah Tosh

 50:920:348  Special Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Jazz (3) Courses may be offered under this general title dealing with special topics intended to involve students in topics not currently represented in the curriculum. Katrina Hazzard-Donald

 

ONLINE COURSES

 

50:070:385  Special Topics in Anthropology: Anthropological Theory (3)  This course will cover the major theories in anthropology, starting with the development and rise of anthropological theory in the late 19th century (e.g. Evolutionism) and continuing with contemporary developments in theory (e.g. Poststructuralism and Postmodernism). It will include theories by leading anthropologists such as Boas, Malinowski, Mead, Levi Strauss, Geertz and Bourdieu. Patrick McCarty

 50:202:203  Confinement & Corrections (3)  History and organization of American corrections. Emphasis on sentencing, custodial institutions, intermediate sanctions, community corrections, and mechanisms for release. Prerequisite: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201. Ross Allen

 50:202:354  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Hate Crimes: Causes, Controls and Controversies (3)  This upper-level criminal justice class will focus on the response of police, courts, and corrections system to hate crimes. Important issues affecting society and the criminal justice system as a whole will be examined in depth. Students will be expected to read scholarly work exploring these issues; participate in class discussions; conduct library research; write short, informal memos and a senior-level research paper; present oral reports on their research; and demonstrate their understanding of assigned readings and the research reported by classmates in a final examination. Brenna Stone

50:202:355  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Policy Issues During Drug Epidemics (3)  In this class, students will learn about the various factors linked with drug epidemics, and gain a greater understanding of some of the recent drug epidemics in the United States. The class will cover the roles of drug users and drug dealers, how epidemics are quantified, the impact of epidemics, responses to epidemics, and perceptions of epidemics. Walter Campbell

 50:202:404  Service/Internship in Criminal Justice (BA)  Supervised service/internship in a criminal justice agency. No more than 3 credits to be counted toward the major. Open to off-campus students only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Cheryl Hallman

 

CAMDEN COUNTY COLLEGE – BLACKWOOD CAMPUS

 

50:202:342  Domestic Violence (3)  Comprehensive overview of all forms of domestic violence and some of the variables such as race, gender, class, and sexual orientation that impact the criminal justice system’s response to these crimes. Specific topics may include intimate partner violence, elder abuse, sexual victimization, and battering. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status, or permission of instructor. Christopher Auletto

 50:202:362  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Philadelphia Organized Crime (3)  This course is designed to look at the past, present, and future of Philadelphia organized crime. Furthermore, this course will explore some of the most prominent and popular theories of crime and delinquency that are often cited as explanations for why people become members of crime groups. Ross Allen

50:202:449  Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3)  The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Tracy Swan

50:920:301  Methods and Techniques of Social Research (3)  Introduces basic methods and techniques of social research, including formulating research design and utilizing appropriate data-gathering techniques. Joseph DaGrossa

 

ATLANTIC CAPE COMMUNITY COLLEGE – MAYS LANDING CAMPUS

 

50:202:362  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: 21st Century Law (3)  Perspectives of leading attorneys or judges on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on criminal law as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:202:204. Dean Wyks

 50:202:457  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Issues in Corrections, Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice (3)  Perspectives of correctional practitioners on criminal justice topics. Emphasis on corrections as a career. Prerequisites: 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:202:203. Joseph DaGrossa

 50:202:449  Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice (3)  The development, implementation, and evaluation of criminal justice policy. Ethics of law enforcement, court processes, and corrections. Evaluation of research on topics such as race, class, and gender disparities; capital punishment; gun control; drug policy; pornography; and gambling. Prerequisites: Senior status. 50:202:101 or 50:202:201 and 50:920:301. Tracy Swan

 50:920:332  Inequality in the United States (3)  Analyzes class inequality and the class structure in U.S. society, with particular attention to the processes which generate, reproduce, and change social and economic inequalities, as well as the consequences of inequality. When offered with a lab, this course has a mandatory engaged civic learning component (ECL), included in a 1-credit lab section, making the course worth a total of 4 credits rather than 3. In those circumstances, all students must register for the course and one lab section, and the 1-credit lab section is a corequisite. Prerequisite: 50:920:101 or 50:920:207. Augustine Isamah

 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE GRADUATE PROGRAM

 

56:202:500  Policy Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)  A research- and writing-oriented seminar that will prepare students for conducting criminal justice policy analysis. Topics include the role of interest groups and organizational participants in the policy process, types of policies, and models of policy research. Examined are current criminal justice policies using analysis that considers the development, implementation, and evaluation of policy (i.e., what has occurred in policy, why, and at what benefits or costs). Also covered is policy formulation, which involves the development of new policy options to remedy public problems. Bryn Herrschaft

56:202:601 Data Analysis in Criminal Justice (3) This course provides students with a grounding in the basic tools used in quantitative analysis in the field of criminal justice along with an introduction to the statistical issues involved in the design and logic of research. Students learn to use various nonparametric measures of association as well as parametric tests of significance and are introduced to the fundamentals of correlation, regression, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in statistics. Barbara Previ

56:202:673:01  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Investigation Practicum (3)  Under instructor supervision, students provide investigative services for actual legal cases. Through seminars and field experience, students learn investigative techniques such as reviewing discovery, locating and interviewing witnesses, obtaining records, and testifying and writing detailed reports. Kevin Murphy

56:202:674  Special Topics in Juvenile Justice: Practicum: National Resource Center on Children and Families of the Incarcerated  (3)  Provides students with an opportunity to be part of a program that spans three decades in providing resources on children and families of the incarcerated. Opportunities for students include gathering and disseminating current research and resources, identifying policy and practice initiatives across the country, tracking the needs of programs and systems, requesting information, participating in public awareness campaigns, and collaboration in planning for NRCCFI events and activities. Ann Adalist-Estrin

56:202:675  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Criminal Justice Learning Abroad: Comparative Criminal Justice in U.K. (G) (3)  A course focusing on crime and justice of a foreign country. Includes regular class meetings, required readings, and written assignments, as well as a short-term learning/service experience in a foreign country. Ross Allen

56:202:675  Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Mass Incarceration, Re-entry and Justice (3)  This course examines three components related to mass incarceration in the United States: 1) the social, political, and economic forces behind the rise in mass imprisonment; 2) the processes of incarceration and returning home–or “prisoner reentry”–with a focus on the collateral health and social consequences for former prisoners, their families, and communities; and 3) the promising multilevel reform initiatives geared toward addressing the issue of mass incarceration and the difficulties faced by prisoners when reentering their communities. As this is an Engaged Civic Learning course, students will be equipped with practical training and will participate in a community outreach effort to educate Camden residents about the process of getting their criminal records expunged. Nathan Link